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Health News 05/2012


Sleep lessens the effect genes have on weight
By Nanci Hellmich, USA TODAY Sleeping more may help you fight a genetic predisposition to gain weight, a new study says. People were considered to get short sleep if they slept less than seven hours a night. People were considered to get short sleep if ...

St. Jude's Wiring Problem Persists
By CHRISTOPHER WEAVER A heart-device problem that has plagued St. Jude Medical Inc. shows no signs of relenting, according to data in the company's latest performance report, expected to be published Tuesday. The rate of a key failure for the company's ...

Mom accused of putting bleach into toddler's eyes
April 30, 2012: Jennifer Mothershead enters court.Q13Fox Authorities say a Washington mother repeatedly put bleach into her toddler daughter's eyes, causing permanent vision loss in child's right eye, Q13 Fox reports. 29-year-old Jennifer Mothershead ...

More babies being born addicted to prescription painkillers
By Robin Erb An increased reliance on prescription painkillers and the resulting addiction has now shown up in the most vulnerable patients -- America's newborns, according to a report published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association ...

Sleeping for more than nine hours may help weight loss: research
Being lazy can help weight loss as a study found getting nine hours a night counteracts a genetic predisposition to obesity. Sleeping for more than nine hours a night may help those with a genetic predisposition to being overweight stay healthy, ...

Being bilingual 'boosts brain power'
The US researchers from Northwestern University say bilingualism is a form of brain training - a mental "work out" that fine-tunes the mind. Speaking two languages profoundly affects the brain and changes how the nervous system responds to sound, ...

Specialists may downplay the harms of mammography in younger women
By Joe Rojas-Burke, The Oregonian Dania Maxwell/The OregonianA Portland woman undergoes screening mammography at a Kaiser Permanente medical office in this August 2011 file photograph. Expert recommendations on mammography couldn't be more confusing ...

Insight: Cancer in Africa: Fighting a nameless enemy
By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent ACCRA (Reuters) - In Emanuel Adu's language, Twi, people call the skin cancer that is invading his cheek and nose "sasabro". It means a disease that eats away at you. The 73-year-old former cocoa farmer ...

FDA approves new orphan drug to treat a form of Gaucher disease
The US Food and Drug Administration today approved Elelyso (taliglucerase alfa) for long-term enzyme replacement therapy to treat a form of Gaucher disease, a rare genetic disorder. Gaucher disease occurs in people who do not produce enough of an ...

Universal Heart Screening Recommended for Newborns
All newborns should undergo a standard screening for life-threatening heart defects, according to new recommendations published in the Lancet. Researchers suggested that a pulse oximetry, a low-cost, non-invasive device that tests patients' blood ...

For The Truth About ObamaCare, Just Follow The Money
ObamaCare: Yet another study — this one a survey of America's largest firms — shows why employers will drop health coverage for their workers once they do the math and see how much they can save. It's no longer news that President Obama isn't even ...

Philadelphia health clinics get a boost from new federal funding
By Don Sapatkin At Project HOPE in Camden, a group of 10 behavioral health patients is sometimes packed into an exam room at midday while the doctor is at lunch. That is expected to change over the next few years as the health center for the homeless ...

Avery's tragedy: baby whose bucket list was read by millions around the world dies
Keeping a smile on her face despite suffering from a genetic disorder was one of many things she achieved in just five months of life, inspiring people around the world. Texas couple Laura and Michael Canahuati compiled a "bucket list" for their ...

Does Dopamine Explain Why Slackers Slack?
By Kathleen Doheny May 1, 2012 -- Don't have any motivation at work today? You may be able to blame your brain and its relationship with the chemical dopamine. The way your brain handles dopamine may predict whether you are a hard worker or a slacker, ...

Number of drug-addicted newborns soars
By Sonja Isger The past decade has seen a threefold increase in the number of babies born addicted to painkillers, a study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed. The study has more alarming news, ...

Study: Computer Use Combined with Exercise May Protect Memory
By Alexandra Sifferlin | @acsifferlin | May 2, 2012 | + Sitting in front of a computer screen may seem like inactivity, but it could be giving your brain a workout. It may even help protect your brain from cognitive decline, Mayo Clinic researchers say ...

Slacker or go-getter? Brain chemical may tell
What gives you the motivation to go the extra mile for a promotion or a perfect test score? It may be your levels of a brain chemical called dopamine. Researchers have found amounts of this chemical in three brain regions determine if a person is a ...

Area health clinics get a boost from new federal funding
By Don Sapatkin At Project HOPE in Camden, a group of 10 behavioral health patients is sometimes packed into an exam room at midday while the doctor is at lunch. That is expected to change over the next few years as the health center for the homeless ...

More women need breasts removed after brachytherapy
Women who got seed radiation as part of their breast cancer treatment were more likely to have an infection or breast pain than those who were treated with whole-breast irradiation, in a new study. And more patients treated with the quicker and more ...

Employers save $422 billion if they dump health coverage. Will they?
In the health reform debate, there's a lot of crystal-ball gazing about what employers will do when, in 2014, tens of millions of Americans become eligible for publicly-subsidized health insurance. Will they continue paying for workers' health plans, ...

Avery Lynn, Bellaire baby with a 'bucket list,' dies at 6 months
The heartbreaking story of the Bellaire baby with a terminal illness and her own “bucket list” has come to an end even sooner than expected. Six-month-old Avery Lynn Canahuati died Monday afternoon after a lung collapsed, her father announced Tuesday ...

US to Expedite E. Coli Tracking
By BILL TOMSON WASHINGTON—The US Department of Agriculture will unveil plans Wednesday to begin acting more quickly to prevent outbreaks of E. coli illnesses by tracking contaminated ground beef to its source as soon as a preliminary test detects the ...

Spinal muscular atrophy: What is it?
Spinal muscular atrophy, the disease that killed Baby Avery Lynn Canahuati, is a genetic disorder that kills more babies than any other genetic disease. Avery Lynn Canahuati, the "bucket list baby" who was born in November with spinal muscular atrophy ...

Study examines red wine's anti-aging ingredient
(CBS News) Red wine has long been touted for its health benefits, including its anti-aging properties. But the question is how does it work? A new study provides insight into how the anti-aging ingredient in red wine, resveratrol, functions in the body ...

'Supermoon' coming this Saturday
By Fox Van Allen, Tecca This weekend will be an absolute delight for both professional and amateur astronomers alike: On Saturday, the United States will be treated to a "supermoon" event — an evening where the full moon appears at its largest and ...

Parents of Texas sextuplets say 1 baby still has health problems but she is a ...
Parents of Texas sextuplets say 1 baby still has health problems but she is a ...

Your Drive to Compete May Be Down to Dopamine
By Maia Szalavitz | @maiasz | May 2, 2012 | + Are you the kind of person who is always “on,” constantly driven to achieve? Or are you more of a slacker type, less motivated by the promise of material reward? The difference may lie in the responsiveness ...

Red Wine Anti Aging Properties Confirmed
Good news for wine drinkers the world over. New research is showing the properties of a chemical present in red wine, known as resveratrol, does indeed have anti-aging properties. It was always postulated that resveratrol had benefits, but the question ...

As preterm births soar globally, US ranks 130 of 184
NEW YORK (Reuters) - The world's developed countries have seen their average rate of premature births double to 6 percent since 1995, despite efforts to reduce the phenomenon, according to a report released on Wednesday. Worldwide, 15 million of the ...

Vaginas Host Dynamic Battleground for Microbes, Study Finds
The human vagina is a lively place, full of beneficial bacteria that discourage nasty microbes from invading. Now, new research finds this ecosystem is even more mysterious than previously realized. Not only do women vary widely in what sorts of ...

Bird flu paper that raised bioterrorism fears published
By Julie Steenhuysen | CHICAGO (Reuters) - The journal Nature has published the first of two controversial papers about laboratory-enhanced versions of the deadly bird flu virus that initially sparked fears among US biosecurity experts that it could be ...

107 charged in Medicare fraud busts in 7 cities
MIAMI—Federal authorities charged 107 doctors, nurses and social workers in seven cities with Medicare fraud Tuesday in a nationwide crackdown on unrelated scams that allegedly bilked the taxpayer-funded program of $452 million -- the highest dollar ...

State senator calls for investigation into 'meat glue'
By Tiffany Hsu Just when you thought the “pink slime” controversy was in the past and that the discovery of mad-cow disease had blown over, the forces that be now bring yet another cause for carnivore concern: calls for an investigation into 'meat glue ...

Is Your Child at Risk for Type II Diabetes?
By Andrew Schorr HERWriter May 2, 2012 - 10:23am The headline in The New York Times recently screamed what we had feared -- and worse. Not only is obesity among children leading to what was once only known as “adult onset” diabetes, but the kids are ...

Lab-made bird flu: First of 2 papers published
By MALCOLM RITTER | AP New York • Four months ago the US government sought to block publication of two studies about how scientists created an easily spread form of bird flu. Now a revised version of one paper is seeing the light of day with the ...

As preterm births soar globally, U.S. is 130 of 184
by Sharon Begley, Last updated May 02, 2012 NEW YORK (Reuters) - The world's developed countries have seen their average rate of premature births double to six percent since 1995, despite efforts to reduce the phenomenon, according to a report released ...

Feds charge 107 with defrauding Medicare of $452M
By Michael Winter, USA TODAY The Obama administration today announced charges against 107 health providers in seven cities who stand accused of bilking $452 million from Medicare. Agents arrested doctors, nurses, therapists, social workers, ...

Texas sextuplets' parents: 1 sick baby a 'fighter'
AP | Posted: Wednesday, May 2, 2012 2:15 pm | (0) Comments Dr. Michael Belfort congratulates David and Lauren Perkis, parents of sextuplets, after a news conference held at Texas Children's Hospital Pavilion for Women on Wednesday, May 2, 2012, ...

US babies fare poorly on preterm births, heart screening, and obesity
By Deborah Kotz Despite all the dollars we spend on health care, American babies are getting short shrift when it comes to good health outcomes. The premature birth rate in the United States is abysmal; our country ranks 131st -- with a preterm birth ...

Bird flu can transmit in mammals, study finds
The results, showing an engineered flu strain can spread easily between ferrets, derive from a controversial study that stirred debate over doing research with the potential to cause harm. A poultry seller in Vietnam, which is still struggling with new ...

SEIU drops initiatives as part of California hospital accord
A labor union that pushed a pair of ballot measures to rein in excessive hospital billing and expand healthcare for the poor has dropped them -- in exchange for an agreement that, among other things, enlists the hospital industry in the union's ...

LA program offers healthcare for illegal restaurant workers
A restaurant workers' group and an LA clinic have partnered in a program to provide inexpensive healthcare coverage for illegal immigrants and other uninsured food service workers. By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times A restaurant workers' group and a Los ...

The American Cancer Society hosts fundraiser at Buffalo Wild Wings
By April Kaull, Anchor - email Chances are someone you know has dealt with cancer at some point in their lives, whether it's a family member or a friend. The American Cancer Society is making strides in the battle against not only breast cancer, ...

Marijuana Use on the Rise in Teens
More teens are using marijuana while fewer parents are talking to kids about drugs. That's according to a new study by The Partnership at Drugfree.org and MetLife. Heavy marijuana use in teens is up 42 percent since 2008. "When they use those drugs, ...

Sextuplet parents brace for an 'extraordinary responsibility'
By Todd Ackerman "We're ordinary people entrusted by God with an extraordinary responsibility," said David Perkins, shown with Lauren and daughter Caroline at Texas Children's Hospital. Nurses line up in the delivery room to assist with the birth of ...

15 million infants are born preterm
By: AP , JournalNow Staff | The Associated Press About 15 million premature babies are born every year, more than 1 in 10 of the world's births and a bigger problem than previously thought, according to the first country-by-country estimates of this ...

Health Law Strikedown May Disrupt Medicare
Tossing out President Barack Obama's health care law would have major unintended consequences for Medicare's payment systems, unseen but vital plumbing that handles 100 million monthly claims from hospitals and other service providers, ...

Aspirin is as 'good as warfarin'
By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News Aspirin could be as effective as more expensive drugs for most patients with heart failure, according to an international team of researchers. Their study on more than 2000 patients, published in ...

Medicare Disruptions Seen If Health Law Is Struck
by AP WASHINGTON (AP) — Tossing out President Barack Obama's health care law would have major unintended consequences for Medicare's payment systems, unseen but vital plumbing that handles 100 million monthly claims from hospitals and other service ...

Over 1 In Every 10 Babies Born Premature Globally
More than 10% of babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to a new report issued by Save the Children, WHO (The World Health Organization), The March of Dimes, and Newborn & Child Health. The report, called "Born Too Soon: The Global Action ...

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